NFL

40 NFL Quarterbacks Who Suffered Rapid Declines

Darren - September 30, 2020
NFL

40 NFL Quarterbacks Who Suffered Rapid Declines

Darren - September 30, 2020
Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

38. Tua Tagovailoa

Tagovailoa entered the 2020 draft with questions about his durability. However, the Miami Dolphins were ready to risk it because they believed him to be a blue-chip prospect. The Dolphins, under Brian Flores, look an exciting project, and fans were excited to see the Hawaiian play. However, Flores managed Tagovailoa’s game time carefully and only introduced him in game six in place of Ryan Fitzpatrick.

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From there, Tagovailoa became the starting quarterback. The problem is that he was remarkably inconsistent and this may affect his long-term prospects in Miami. Rookies can be inconsistent, but Flores dropped him twice in place of Fitzpatrick. Maybe it’s not the worst of declines, but he needs to show much more to fulfill his potential and enable his teammates to trust him.

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37. Carson Wentz

In 2020, the Eagles dropped struggling quarterback Wentz in the middle of a $128 million contract in favor of Jalen Hurts. His decline is one of the worst in the NFL because of the financial burden and sheer disappointment he inflicted upon his fans. Wentz endured a horrific season as he led the league in interceptions and sacks, posting huge numbers in both categories.

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His passer rating dropoff was one of the most dramatic in NFL history as he went from 62.9 in 2019 to 49.6 in 2020. Meanwhile, Wentz was a former MVP candidate in 2020 when he became their starter over the course of their Super Bowl-winning season. But his meltdown continues and he is an extremely expensive mistake. It’s always dangerous to hand a massive contract to a quarterback after a single good season.

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36. Kirk Cousins

The Vikings signed Cousins as a free agent in 2018 to an $84 million contract. It looked like their faith paid off because he immediately fired off a Pro Bowl season. But things haven’t been perfect for Cousins in Minnesota. The quarterback suffers from bouts of wretched inconsistency. This was visible at the beginning of both the 2019 and 2020 seasons as the Vikings started terribly.

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Part of the reason behind his decline was Gary Kubiak’s preference for non-play action passes. This totally wastes the best of Cousins. However, as a mature quarterback, it is on him to adapt and perform in whatever system. Cousins won an NFC Offensive Player of the Week award in 2020 so he clearly has what it takes when he is in the right set-up. But it is frustrating for the fans.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

35. Russell Wilson

Wilson started the 2020 season as a clear MVP candidate. However, the Seattle Seahawks’ superstar suffered a decline after the first month of the season. In five games to start the season, he threw just three interceptions but over the course of the next six, he threw nine. It’s not the worst decline of all-time but it was disappointing and curious because he began the year so well.

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In his final game of the season, he completed just 11 of 27 passes and the Rams sacked him five times. Meanwhile, he also threw a pick-six. This has led to increased scrutiny and questions about one of the most consistent quarterbacks in the NFL. Wilson can bounce back but it’s not easy to shake off the doubters. Part of it is that the Seahawks changed their system but Wilson must improve.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

34. Lamar Jackson

Jackson was so good in 2019 that he won the MVP award over every player in the NFL. While the Baltimore Ravens quarterback is undoubtedly talented, there is no doubt that 2020 was immensely frustrating by his lofty standards. Throwing a pick-six in the playoffs against the Buffalo Bills ended the Ravens’ hopes of postseason glory.

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However, overall, the Ravens just weren’t the same force. All of Jackson’s numbers declined from his MVP year as his passing success rate went from 66.5% to 60.5%. That’s a significant drop for a player of his quality. Of course, Jackson has the skills to bounce back but the fact remains that he didn’t have a great season. Fans hoped that the Ravens would move forward but instead they went backward.

33. Mitch Trubisky

Trubisky made the Pro Bowl in 2018 and convinced the Chicago Bears they perhaps had themselves a franchise quarterback. However, the young quarterback quickly demonstrated that he is nowhere near that quality, at least not for a franchise with championship ambitions. When Chicago failed to make the playoffs the following season, they decided that they needed to do something.

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But bringing Nick Foles into the fold wasn’t the answer. They dropped Trubisky in 2020 in place of the former Super Bowl winner. But they reintroduced him late in the season. Trubisky, to his credit, improved when he returned to the team. However, the reality is that his future is no longer in Chicago because of his decline. A break may be best for both parties.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

32. Dwayne Haskins

Many analysts slated the New York Giants because they drafted Daniel Jones instead of Haskins. In the end, Washington drafted him in the first round in 2019 but he was a terrible bust. Haskins has the physical attributes to be a solid NFL quarterback but suffers from a lack of maturity. His meltdown from college to the NFL is one of the most disappointing declines in the game.

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To be fair, his first season was difficult because this was a team in transition. Then, Ron Rivera came in and revived the franchise. However, he never rated Haskins from the very beginning and the young man didn’t help his cause. Finally, he violated health protocols and the franchise released him. Only will tell if manages to revive his career and get back on track.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

31. Gardner Minshew

Minshew came out of nowhere with his glorious mustache to reignite the Jacksonville Jaguars in 2019. However, he couldn’t sustain it and it looks like Trevor Lawrence will end his dream in Florida. The Washington State star played well during a 2019 season where Nick Foles proved to be an utter disaster. However, he wasn’t great in 2020 and will pay a cruel price.

Mandatory Credit: Bleacher Report

Undoubtedly talented, Minshew is a passionate figure. But he suffered several injuries throughout 2020 which brought about declines in all of his stats. He was unable to play as well as he wanted as the Jaguars alternated between him and Mike Glennon. Minshew’s future is up in the air because the Jaguars will draft a true franchise quarterback in Clemson’s young superstar Lawrence.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

30. Baker Mayfield

Mayfield has it all to prove. The Cleveland Browns quarterback appeared to have it all in his rookie season but fell into a sharp decline in his second year. After going 0-16 the year before he arrived, Mayfield’s arrival boosted the franchise. However, a sophomore slump hit him hard.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

Fans perceived his confidence as arrogance and all of the good things he did in his rookie year fell apart. Overall, the team lacked confidence and regressed even though many touted them for a playoff run. Unlike others on this list, Mayfield has time on his side to arrest the curve. He proved that by leading the Browns to the Divisional Round of the 2020 playoffs.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

29. Peyton Manning

For many seasons, Manning was one of the best quarterbacks in the league. Then he got old and his level of on-field play plummeted. It’s a fact that for most QBs, the decline is not a gradual one. That’s exactly what happened to Manning. He was brilliant but his final season in Denver was appalling.

Peyton Manning, Tennessee
Mandatory Credit: Time Free Press

Manning went from throwing for the most yards and touchdowns in NFL history to injury after injury in the space of a year.  In short, Father Time isn’t a great friend to anybody. But after such a stellar career, it was a shame for him to end things as a shadow for his former self.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

28. Colt McCoy

The ever-popular McCoy has suffered a frustrating career in the NFL. After a stellar few years with the Texas Longhorns, the Cleveland Browns drafted the exciting young quarterback. He was their starter in his sophomore year and the signs were promising that he’d go on and do great things.

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Then they ditched him for Brandon Weedon and McCoy’s career has never recovered. After a year as a back-up in San Francisco, McCoy joined the Redskins. He made five appearances in his first season but never matched that since. Now on the books of the New York Giants, this is less of a decline than an avalanche.

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27. Eli Manning

Manning’s ending was more dignified than that of his brother. After a legendary career with the New York Giants, it was clear that he was no longer the same force that he once was. However, Manning left the game at the right time as Daniel Jones emerged as the Giants’ starter.

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He played just four games in his final season, the lowest number of his career. It was a bittersweet ending for the franchise who finished the season 4-12. However, unlike other players on this list, Manning walked away with his head held high.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

26. Randall Cunningham

Cunningham did the opposite to Eli Manning and stuck around the game long enough to become a third-string quarterback. The four-time Pro Bowler was excellent for the Philadelphia Eagles for over 10 years and also had a decent spell with the Minnesota Vikings.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

But you can’t be a worldbeater forever, as Cunningham discovered. Meanwhile, a torn ACL in 1991 forced him to reassess his style of play because he could no longer rush to the same effect. Age and injuries catch up with almost every player. That’s the sad truth.

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25. Vince Young

If Young’s professional career matched up with his achievements at the college level then he would be a consensus Hall-of-Famer. However, the former NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year award winner was never able to match his NCAA level for any of the other franchises he played for.

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Things started out well with the Tennessee Titans but went into decline in 2010. Then the Titans traded him to the Eagles but he only started three games for Philly. After this, he never played another NFL game despite popping up on the rosters of several other franchises including the Bills, the Packers, and the Browns.

Mandatory Credit: Sports Illustrated

24. Johnny Unitas

A legendary quarterback, Unitas was the leader of the Baltimore Colts’ offense for 17 seasons. However, when the latter came around, the hero was no longer the same. After so long in the league, he was unable to produce the same impact as before with his battered body. The quarterback suffered so many injuries that they became too much for him.

Mandatory Credit: Sports Illustrated

Owner Robert Irsay went over coach Don McCafferty’s head and traded Unitas to the San Diego Chargers. Fans never forgave Irsay for this, but you could understand his thinking. Unitas only managed to play five games in this new uniform before the end came.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

23. Chad Pennington

Credit where credit is due, Pennington is a fighter. The only two-time NFL Comeback Player of the Year award winner, he knew how to overcome adversity. When it looked like his decline was final, he bounced back. At least until his last two seasons with the Miami Dolphins.

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In short, they were disastrous. After starting every game in 2008, he suffered a devastating shoulder injury. He barely played over the last two years of his career as injuries ravaged his body. To sum up, it was a sad but all-too-common ending to his career.

Mandatory Credit: Bleacher Report

22. Steve Young

Young replaced Joe Montana in San Francisco but defied expectations to become a legend in his own right. The three-time Super Bowl winner was one of the most effective quarterbacks that the league has ever seen. In the end, his decline was rapid but not of his own making and mercifully didn’t last for long.

Mandatory Credit: Niners Nation

He only started three games in 1999, his final season as a professional. However, in those three games, he suffered two concussions. The 49ers didn’t feel comfortable playing him and said they’d release him if he didn’t hang up his cleats. Even though the Broncos wanted to sign him, he did the right thing and quit.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

21.Tom Brady

By no means terrible yet, Brady is still not the great powerhouse he once was. A pick-six in his debut for the Tampa Bay Buccanneers showed that at the age of 43, nobody can expect him to be a dominant leader in the same way. It’s not that he needs Bill Belichick, but rather that he’s just getting old.

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There is no doubt that Brady is in decline. Of course, it’s almost laughable that we’re talking about it like it’s a surprise. His numbers dropped in 2019 but when you add in the disruption of the 2020 offseason, combined with a new playbook and his weary body, you can see why he may struggle.

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20. Tim Tebow

Sometimes momentum can hide the warning signs from the fans. Tebow starred in the Denver Broncos’ playoff run in 2011 but the coaches had their doubts about him. In the end, they decided to trade him to the New York Jets, where he went into a swift decline.

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In short, that was the end of his career as a starting quarterback. He made 12 appearances for the Eagles but only two from the start as opposition teams exposed his game. From there he trained with the New England Patriots and the Philadelphia Eagles, but neither of them wanted him.

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19. Daunte Culpepper

Culpepper is one of the most unfortunate players on this list because in another life he would have had a few more great seasons than he managed. He made the Pro Bowl three times during his time with the Minnesota Vikings before disaster struck. The talented quarterback blew out his knee and was never the same player again.

Mandatory Credit: Sports Illustrated

It was a massive shame because he was excellent before this. However, the injury ended his Vikings’ career and he went on a tour of the NFL. Ultimately, his career ended with a whimper as a member of the Detroit Lions’ 0-16 roster. In the NFL, a career can change in a split-second.

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18. Drew Brees

Coming in 2020, many fans expected the New Orleans Saints to go deep into the playoffs. That may still happen, but there is no doubt there’s a slump in their offense. Suddenly fingers are pointing at Brees who looks like the 42-year-old that he is.

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Brees doesn’t have a cannon of an arm, so he relies on short passes to great effect. However, this depends on a significant pass completion rate and Brees isn’t reaching the same standard as before. Only time will tell what happens but the warning signs are there that a decline is finally setting in.

Mandatory Credit: Sports Illustrated

17. Warren Moon

After a stunning career in Canada, the Houston Oilers brought Moon to Texas where he starred for many seasons. Selected for the Pro Bowl nine times, Moon never won a Super Bowl. However, all good things come to an end and Moon finally went on the decline.

Mandatory Credit: Bleacher Report

He spent a few years in Minnesota and then a couple more in Seattle. But at the age of 43, he joined the Kansas City Chiefs as a backup quarterback. There is a time when you need to know when to stop. In the end, he only started three games for the franchise before retiring.

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16. Brett Favre

For a while, Favre seemed to blossom out of spite. Initially, it looked like he retired at the perfect time. The decline had yet to set in and he was a hero in the eyes of Packers’ fans. However, then he decided he wanted back in but Green Bay already dumped him for Aaron Rodgers.

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He was excellent for a couple of seasons. After a spell with the Jets, he almost took Minnesota to the Super Bowl. But then he endured a few too many hits that took their toll on his aging body. Next, the interceptions increased and Favre’s career ended after a savage sack in his final game.

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15. Mark Sanchez

The New York Jets thought that they had themselves a future legend in the mold of Joe Namath. But that turned out not to be the case, as Sanchez started well but went into severe decline. He had three decent seasons at the top before the doubters made their voices heard and his career went into a downward spiral.

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Sanchez did make an impact on the Eagles after Nick Foles suffered a serious injury. But from then on, teams consigned him to life as a back-up. Finally, he started just three games in his last three seasons as a professional. It was quite the fall from grace.

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14. Ken Stabler

It’s a tragedy that Stabler didn’t make it to the Hall of Fame when he was alive. The former Raiders’ star was a brilliant quarterback. He was the Super Bowl XI MVP after a stunning performance. Furthermore, he made the Pro Bowl four times as a consistent leader in Oakland.

Mandatory Credit: Bleacher Report

However, his decline was swift. Oakland traded him to the Houston Oilers where he was average at best. But there was still time for one more move in the NFL. The New Orleans Saints were still a poor franchise when he joined them. After a series of knee injuries, Stabler lacked the mobility of his younger days.

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13. Donavon McNabb

Statistically, McNabb had one of the best seasons of his career in 2009. However, the numbers don’t always tell the whole story. Coach Andy Reid decided that he had seen enough and that at the age of 33, McNabb was on the decline. It seemed ruthless because McNabb went to the Super Bowl with him and knew no other coach.

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Nonetheless, the Eagles traded McNabb to the Washington Redskins. Then he spent the season feuding with Mike Shanahan, who dropped him twice. After a weird year in the capital, they moved him on to Minnesota. After a 1-5 start, the Vikings benched him and he never started another game in the NFL.

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12. Matt Schaub

At the age of 39, Schaub currently sits behind Matt Ryan in Atlanta, but there’s no shame in that. However, his decline from his best days with the Houston Texans is stark. He guided the Texans to the playoffs twice before falling off the bandwagon and failing to produce the same impact.

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Since the Texans cut him, Schaub was never a regular starter again. He couldn’t get past Derek Carr in Oakland and was Joe Flacco’s backup in Baltimore. Overall, backup quarterbacks have one of the loneliest jobs in football because they know the chances of them playing are so slim.

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11. Joe Namath

Beloved in New York, Namath is a Jets’ hero. However, Father Time took his toll on the legend’s body, most notably his knees. The Hall of Famer only started eight games in his final season with the franchise at the age of 33. But he wasn’t ready to hang up his cleats just yet.

Mandatory Credit: Sports Illustrated

They say that the number 13 is unlucky for some, and so it proved for Namath. He joined the Los Angeles Rams for his 13th season in 1977. First, it was extremely weird to see him wearing another team’s uniform. Secondly, he was horrendous, playing just four games and throwing the same number of interceptions in his final match.

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10. Cam Newton

One of the few players on this list with a redemption story, Newton is currently reigniting his career with the New England Patriots. However, this comes after an extraordinary decline that saw him spend significant time as a free agent. Finally, Bill Belichick decided to take a chance and brought him in to fill Tom Brady’s boots.

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The 2015 MVP regressed significantly in 2019 as a combination of injuries and a lack of motivation affected him. After suffering a Lisfranc fracture, the Panthers placed him on injury reserve. There were big questions over his ability to convince a franchise that he should play but he has a second chance.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

9. Andy Dalton

The Dallas Cowboys’ backup is near the end of his career. After eight seasons with the Cincinnati Bengals, Dalton finally moved on following the arrival of Joe Burrow. Dalton threw for over 3,000 yards in each of his first three seasons. Furthermore, he helped his team to the playoffs five times, which nobody can sniff at.

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However, Dalton is also the definition of mediocre. He doesn’t do anything brilliantly to set himself apart from his counterparts. But he remains a model professional. Despite his decline, Dallas signed him to help Dak Prescott. By no means a worldbeater, he is still a solid athlete.

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8. Philip Rivers

Rivers left the Los Angeles Chargers for the Indianapolis Colts after 16 years of service. The 38-year-old is perhaps the least-vaunted of the golden generation of elite veteran quarterbacks but has a cannon of an arm. Furthermore, he made the Pro Bowl eight times in his career.

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But there is no doubt that his level has dropped. Rivers was awful in his last season for the Chargers. Of course, he didn’t have much protection or the greatest weapons, but it still felt like the right time for them to cut ties with him. Now he has to prove that his decline isn’t insurmountable with the Colts.

Mandatory Credit: Sports Illustrated

7. Jim McMahon

NFL fans remember McMahon for his thrilling Super Bowl season with the Chicago Bears. However, injuries decimated his career and caused him to abruptly fall into decline. In short, McMahon suffered an obscene number of concussions that affected his on-field ability and off-field life.

Mandatory Credit: Time

His form dropped dramatically and he never recovered. Eventually, the Bears had enough and traded him to San Diego. That kicked off a nomadic period for the quarterback and he only managed three more seasons as a franchise. To sum up, the game took its toll on the veteran.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

6. Josh Freeman

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers thought that Freeman was their franchise quarterback and the early signs were good. However, his decline was swift. For two seasons he was solid, but then it all went downhill very quickly. In 2013, he completed less than 50% of his total pass attempts in three straight losses.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

Then the Buccaneers traded him to the Vikings and things didn’t get better. His single start for Minnesota saw him complete just 20 out of 53 passes. It was horrendous. Freeman only played one more game in the NFL.

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5. Jameis Winston

When Winston entered the NFL, it looked like he had it all. After an excellent first season, he even made it to the Pro Bowl after Tom Brady withdrew from the showpiece event. Ironically, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers would replace Winston with Brady just a few seasons later.

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There is no doubt that Winston has the potential to turn things around. However, he throws far too many interceptions and has the most pick-sixes in an NFL season. His decline is stark and Winston now sits on the bench behind Drew Brees in New Orleans.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

4. Matt Cassel

There’s no doubt that Cassel had a bizarre career. He served for years as Tom Brady’s backup before finally taking over the position in 2008 while Brady recovered from injury. This convinced the Kansas City Chiefs that he was worth bringing to Missouri, and it all started so well.

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Cassel had the season of his life as he helped the Chiefs to the playoffs and even made the Pro Bowl. However, it was all downhill from there as he went into severe decline. He served as a back-up at every other franchise he played for and never lived up to his full potential again.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

3. Michael Vick

One of the most notorious figures in NFL history, Vick initially rebounded successfully from his time in jail. He helped the Eagles to an NFC East title. In sum, it looked like two years of warming a jail cell hadn’t damaged his abilities. But it wasn’t the case.

Michael Vick, Virginia Tech
Mandatory Credit: ESPN

The following year, his turnover rate doubled. Just like that, he lost his place as the Eagles’ starting quarterback. From there he went on to become the Steelers’ back-up and floated around the NFL until the end of his career. Nobody wanted him as he sat as a free agent for his final year.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

2. Robert Griffin III

Poor Griffin. His career is ongoing but there’s no doubt that it has never recovered from the traumatic ending to his rookie year. A revelation with the Washington Redskins, he won the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year award to cap a brilliant season. But then the record-breaker tore ligaments in his knee.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

In sum, the decline was immediate. Despite significant rehabilitation, Griffin was a ghost of his former self. Instead of becoming a franchise quarterback as the Redskins expected, he has drifted around the league as a back-up quarterback. Finally, he serves as a warning to all young quarterbacks how quickly things can change.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

1. Colin Kaepernick

It’s very easy to forget that Kaepernick wasn’t good in his final season with the San Francisco 49ers. For all of his social justice work outside of football, his on-field contribution was in severe decline. Of course, people don’t like to mention that when they condemn NFL teams for not signing him.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

If Kaepernick was elite like Patrick Mahomes, then they would be after him in a flash. But the reality is that he couldn’t nail down the starting QB slot ahead of Blaine Gabbert in his last two years in San Francisco. From 2015 on, he was never the same player as before.

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