MLB

MLB Fans Share Heated Arguments Of Baseball’s Biggest Controversies

Darren - April 20, 2021
MLB

MLB Fans Share Heated Arguments Of Baseball’s Biggest Controversies

Darren - April 20, 2021
Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

10. Think of the Children

“Say steroids became legal,” Rlight wrote. “Then it would be almost necessary in order for anyone to compete. Now we have tons of players doing steroids in the MLB. Well, how are you going to move up from the minor leagues without that boost? So now we’ll have tons of players in the minor leagues doing steroids. Well, how do you get into the minor leagues? Now we have high school kids trying to get their hands on steroids so they can play ball.”

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

Some fans believe that MLB and other sports organizations should simply accept the use of PEDs. They argue what is the difference between taking EPO and a protein shake if everybody is doing it? But the problem is that this will definitely impact children as their bodies are developing. Unfortunately, everybody will try to get an advantage by altering their internal chemistry.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

9. Steroid League

Other fans think that it is naive to try and ban PEDs outright. Some suggest that there should be an alternative league where players can juice themselves to the gills and play. This is unlikely to happen because it would require serious financial backing but it could prove more entertaining for casual viewers because of the increased offense. At the end of the day, adults should be able to do what they want with their bodies.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

Imasunbear made this argument: “If people don’t want to support a league where all the players use steroids, they should be able to, if the league arises, pay to watch a league with more strict rules on drug use. If people want to watch a game where every other hit is a home run, they should be able to pay to watch a game run by the league that allows steroid use.”

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

8. Nostalgia Trip

“I’m a San Francisco Giants fan, and I became a San Francisco Giants fan because Barry Bonds was hitting 73 home runs,” MohnJarston said. “So yes, I absolutely miss the absurd offensive production of that era.” Since then the mantra is that 40 is the new 50. While several players continue to break through that barrier and achieve high returns, the reality is that this is true.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

Furthermore, when Bonds smashed 73 home runs, he was in his late 30s. This simply shouldn’t have been achievable without steroids because his body required recovery time. But for fans who came to the sport during the Steroid Era, there is definitely a certain romance about the excitement of this period. They shrug their shoulders when people say it was cheating because that’s just how baseball was.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

7. Leave Them Out

As we have explained, there are two trains of thought when it comes to steroid use and the Hall of Fame. First of all, some fans believe that it’s pointless to exclude a generation of players considering the lack of regulation and the commonality of PED use. But others firmly think that anybody who took PEDs definitely cheated and nobody should consider them for enshrinement in the Hall.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

“Do I think there are players in the hall that did steroids or something like them?” theseeker323 asked. “Yes. If they are found out to have done it, then they should not get in. If they can get away with it without being caught, then they can get in. You just cannot let someone in the hall who is publicly known to have cheated.” Technically this would permit Bonds to enter because technically nobody has confirmed his PED use.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

6. Recreational Drugs

“To be fair, it was perfectly fine for players in the 70s and 80s to pop greenies before games,” Acascio19 argued. “There are interviews where guys said they literally had them in a bowl in the locker room. The steroid era happened while it wasn’t “illegal” by baseball terms so if we’re gonna come down hard on them why not be hard on the old-timers too?”

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

This is an excellent observation and definitely opens up a Pandora’s Box for MLB executives and Cooperstown. There’s no doubt that there was rampant recreational drug use throughout the 1960s and ”70s, so why shouldn’t those players receive retrospective punishments? Or else, Cooperstown could say that everybody who played before the end of the Steroid Era is exempt from PED-related exclusions.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

5. What’s the Point?

The likes of Barry Bonds, Pete Rose, Roger Clemens, Mark McGwire, and Alex Rodriguez were some of the most exciting and successful players of their respective eras. But none of them are eligible for enshrinement in the Hall of Fame. When fans look at the record books, this does create issues because lesser athletes are in there. How can the HoF have a players’ section without the best players?

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

Siicktiits made the case: “Barry, Roger, and Arod all need to be in the h.o.f. and if they let them in, which they should, then Pete needs to get in as well… Can’t have a hall of fame without the all-time home run and hit leaders. Poor Pete Rose is going to be shunned until the day he dies and they will let him within months after, just watch.” We will just have to wait and see.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

4. Before the Rules

“Pete Rose goes in as a player only. All steroid-era players go in. There were no rules about it. Any player who received a suspension does not. There were rules, and they broke them.” OldTimerNubbins makes the case plain and simple. His point about Rose is definitely an interesting one because it’s difficult to argue that his gambling negatively affected his player performances considering his ludicrous number of records.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

Even if he entered with an asterisk, it might satiate the demands of some fans who think the whole thing is just stupid. Furthermore, the fact that PED use wasn’t properly regulated before the Mitchell Report suggests that these players should be in the clear. When players clearly violate rules it is definitely a different story because the rules are then set in place.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

3. Tarnished Sport

“Sit with a person who thinks Rose shouldn’t be in the HOF long enough because he gambled on baseball and it “tarnishes” a sport, a sport that didn’t allow players of a certain skin color to play for several decades, and you’ll learn the definition of context,” Playingwithfire said. In 1959, the Boston Red Sox became the final team to integrate black players into their team.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

It’s curious how the league makes a big deal out of certain issues and not others. MLB finally integrated Negro League statistics in 2020 but there are a lot more issues in this sport. It’s fair to say that the reaction toward Rose and his gambling may be one of the most disproportionate in baseball history. But it doesn’t look like it will change anytime in the near future.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

2. Not a Care in the World

“Does Pete really want in though? Sometimes I think he likes the controversy it drums up. It was sad to see the Reds be forced to ask for special permission to honor him before a game but hilarious they decided to hold the ceremony at a local casino,” Cracker_please asked. There is a case to be made that Rose accepts and even enjoys the notoriety at this point.

Mandatory Credit: Sports Illustrated

He still has many fans who reckon that he should be in the Hall of Fame but it’s unlikely during his lifetime. As we alluded to earlier, he is a controversial character outside of the field so it’s not against the realms of possibility that he simply doesn’t care. But it shouldn’t be about what any individual wants. At the end of the day, the record books speak for themselves and perhaps should be taken seriously.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

1. Scapegoats

Jeff Luhnow and A.J. Hinch were the main scapegoats of the Houston Astros scandal. Houston fired the pair after MLB suspended them but this discounted the role the players played. However, the athletes themselves didn’t suffer any personal punishment. Furthermore, their World Series wins remain on their records. Many fans believe that this is nothing short of an outrage.

Mandatory Credit: USA TODAY Sports

“The manager admitted to knowing about it and not being willing to directly stop it (he says he broke the monitor a couple of times to try and get them to stop) but everything else was the players,” Feintise argued. “The rationale for not punishing the players is that’s it too hard to figure out exactly who was part of it and who wasn’t, but honestly, I have a hard time believing that not all of them knew about it.”

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